Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Published on Tuesday 18 May 2021

Coronavirus (COVID-19) - latest information and advice

COVID-19 Header

 

If you are due to attend First Community for an appointment then we ask you to please telephone the department / person that you plan to visit, BEFORE attending so that we can carry out a brief assessment.

If you are due to attend the East Surrey Hospital site, please visit this page to see the measures put in place to protect patients, the community and NHS staff 

Visiting Caterham Dene Ward

As of 9 April 2021, we are pleased to be able to welcome visitors back to our ward at Caterham Dene Hospital.

In order to continue to keep our patients, staff and visitors safe we have a process in place for managing this and all visits must be booked in advance by telephoning the ward on 01883 837517.

The ward staff will ask screening questions before any visitor is permitted to enter the ward.

COVID-19 useful resources

Select the tiles below to download

Isolation Pack

   Link to post covid rehab page

Managing anxiety tile   Managing new routines tile

 

COVID-19, also known as coronavirus, is a new virus that can affect your lungs and airways. Novel coronavirus (COVID-19) is a new strain of coronavirus first identified in Wuhan City, China. The 2019 novel coronavirus has been spreading since it was first reported in December 2019.

Symptoms include fever and respiratory symptoms including coughing and shortness of breath. Generally, coronavirus can cause more severe symptoms in people with weakened immune systems, older people, and those with long term conditions like diabetes, cancer and chronic lung disease.

Use the NHS 111 coronavirus service if            

  • you feel you cannot cope with your symptoms at home
  • your condition gets worse
  • your symptoms do not get better after 7 days

Please only call 111 if you cannot get help online.

There are things you can do to help stop viruses like coronavirus spreading.

Do

  • cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when you cough or sneeze
  • put used tissues in the bin immediately
  • wash your hands with soap and water often – use hand sanitiser gel if soap and water are not available
  • avoid close contact with people who are unwell

Don’t

  • touch your eyes, nose or mouth if your hands are not clean

Further information 

The Public Health team at Surrey County Council offers some tips to help look after your mental wellbeing during the Coronavirus crisis:

  1. Take breaks from watching, reading or listening to news stories, including social media – overloading on information can impact your mood.
  2. Make time to unwind. If can’t do the things you normally enjoy because you’re staying at home, think about how you could adapt them, or try something new?
  3. Stay connected with others, call friends and family members. The community helpline can also put you in touch with a telephone friend if you don’t have anyone to talk to.
  4. Talk with people you trust about your concerns and how you are feeling.
  5. Stick to the facts. Only read and share accurate information from GOVNHS and Surrey County Council to understand the actual risks to yourself and people you care about. This can make the outbreak less stressful for yourself.
  6. Help others who may be struggling with their mental wellbeing. Check the NHS One You tips on what you can do to help others.
  7. Build physical activity into your daily routine, like dancing to music you love, cleaning your home or following online exercise workouts. This can help reduce stress, anxiety and low mood. Find out more on the Healthy Surrey websiteDownload some useful exercises for ages 65+

There is a range of support and advice on the Healthy Surrey website which includes self-help resourceslocal services (including a 24/7 confidential helpline) and information for those with or dealing with an adult in crisis.

Watch the below recording from Janet Clark, Service Manager Long Term Condition Support Services with a relaxing exercise to help reduce stress and anxiety. 

The coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccine is safe and effective. It gives you the best protection against coronavirus.

Wait to be contacted

The NHS will let you know when it's your turn to have the vaccine. It's important not to contact First Community or other NHS healthcare providers for a vaccination before then.

Below are some vaccine FAQs. Further answers can be found here including vaccination updates in Surrey.

 

Who can get the COVID-19 vaccine

The NHS is currently offering the COVID-19 vaccine to people most at risk from coronavirus.

In England, the vaccine is being offered in some hospitals and pharmacies, at hundreds of local vaccination centres run by GPs and at larger vaccination centres.

It's being given to:

  • people aged 80 and over
  • people who live or work in care homes
  • health and social care workers at high risk

You will also need to be registered with a GP surgery in England. You can register with a GP if you do not have one.

The vaccine will be offered more widely as soon as possible.

The order in which people will be offered the vaccine is based on advice from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI).

Read the latest JCVI advice on priority groups for the COVID-19 vaccination on GOV.UK

 

Advice if you're of childbearing age, pregnant or breastfeeding

There's no evidence the COVID-19 vaccine is unsafe if you're pregnant. But more evidence is needed before you can be routinely offered the vaccine.

The JCVI has updated its advice to recommend you may be able to have the vaccine if you're pregnant and:

  • at high risk of getting coronavirus because of where you work
  • have a health condition that means you're at high risk of serious complications of coronavirus

You can have the COVID-19 vaccine if you're breastfeeding.

Speak to a healthcare professional before you have the vaccination. They will discuss the benefits and risks of the COVID-19 vaccine with you.

You do not need to avoid pregnancy after vaccination. The vaccine cannot give you or your baby COVID-19.

Read the latest COVID-19 vaccine advice if you're pregnant, may get pregnant or are breastfeeding on GOV.UK

 

How the COVID-19 vaccine is given

The COVID-19 vaccine is given as an injection into your upper arm.

It's given as 2 doses. You will have the 2nd dose 3 to 12 weeks after having the 1st dose.

 

How to get the COVID-19 vaccine

If you've been sent a letter you can book your vaccination appointments online.

Book your COVID-19 vaccination appointments

 

How safe is the COVID-19 vaccine?

The vaccines approved for use in the UK have met strict standards of safety, quality and effectiveness set out by the independent Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA).

Any coronavirus vaccine that is approved must go through all the clinical trials and safety checks all other licensed medicines go through. The MHRA follows international standards of safety.

Other vaccines are being developed. They will only be available on the NHS once they have been thoroughly tested to make sure they are safe and effective.

So far, thousands of people have been given a COVID-19 vaccine and reports of serious side effects, such as allergic reactions, have been very rare. No long-term complications have been reported.

To find out more about the vaccines approved in the UK, see:

 

How effective is the COVID-19 vaccine?

The 1st dose of the COVID-19 vaccine should give you good protection from coronavirus. But you need to have the 2 doses of the vaccine to give you longer lasting protection.

There is a chance you might still get or spread coronavirus even if you have the vaccine.

This means it is important to:

  • continue to follow social distancing guidance
  • if you can, wear something that covers your nose and mouth in places where it's hard to stay away from other people

Information:

Read more about why vaccines are safe and important, including how they work and what they contain.

 

COVID-19 vaccine side effects

Most side effects of the COVID-19 vaccine are mild and should not last longer than a week, such as:

  • a sore arm where the needle went in
  • feeling tired
  • a headache
  • feeling achy
  • feeling or being sick

You can take painkillers, such as paracetamol, if you need to.

If you have a high temperature you may have coronavirus or another infection.

If your symptoms get worse or you are worried, call 111.

Allergic reactions

Tell healthcare staff before you are vaccinated if you've ever had a serious allergic reaction (anaphylaxis).

You should not have the vaccine if you've ever had a serious allergic reaction to:

  • a previous vaccine
  • a previous dose of the same COVID-19 vaccine
  • some medicines, household products or cosmetics

Serious allergic reactions are rare. If you do have a reaction to the vaccine, it usually happens in minutes. Staff giving the vaccine are trained to deal with allergic reactions and treat them immediately.

You can report any suspected side effect using the Coronavirus Yellow Card safety scheme.

Visit the Coronavirus Yellow Card to report a vaccine side effect

 

COVID-19 vaccine ingredients

The 2 approved COVID-19 vaccines do not contain any animal products or egg.

 

More information

Watch Sandra talk about her Covid-19 recovery.

Watch Tim talk about his experiences of Caterham Dene Hospital.

Watch Shenaz share her story as she recovers from Covid-19.

 

District nursing team feedback May 2020

 

Paediatric Therapies - Aug 2020

 

District Nursing - Aug 2020

 

Immunisation Team - Aug 2020